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Digital Phantom Leaf Photography

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Digital Phantom Leaf Photography

Daddymoen
For a number of years I have been working, off and on, on a project I now call digital phantom leaf photography. It is a modern, no-voltage, simplified variation of the old kirlian photography technique.
 
Recently I began learning how to use imageJ software and I am struggling to learn enough Java to teach myself how to write plug-ins for my project.  I am looking for someone or some group who might be interested in providing some plugin writing assistance in this open source project.
 
When I first began the project I used FilterMeister to write plug-ins for Adobe Photoshop using 8 bit per channel, RGB images.  That work demonstrated that the vein structure of a freshly picked leaf could be seen in a pseudo-colored image of an area in which the leaf had been physically removed.  I have 2 example images I can provide from this previous work that appear to show this phenomenon. In my present work I would prefer to use 16 bit per channel TIF images and Photoshop cannot handle this task adequately.  
 
Brief Technique Description:
An ordinary digital camera is used to photograph a leaf both before and after a portion of the leaf has been removed. Post-processing of this image uses a lookup table approach to use pseudocoloring as a means of displaying pixel value variation. Previous work shows that the basic approach is workable. I feel that improvements can be made in the plug-in design to provide higher-quality images of the missing or "Phantom" portion of the leaf.
 
If you know someone or some group that may be interested in working on this Open Source project please have them contact me.
 
Thank you,

Daddymoen
Imagination is more important than knowledge.  Albert Einstein
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Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography

Daddymoen
I've posted more information on the project describing: operating theory; how the images are created; along with two example Digital Phantom Leaf images.  This can be seen on my website at:   http://afterlife-knowledge.com/phanpics.html.  

The best of the example images is the pair near the bottom of the page.   The image on the left shows the physical leaf vein structure in the area where the physical leaf will later be removed.  The image on the right shows the leaf after that portion has been cut away and removed.  This image was processed using a rather crude Filtermeister pseudo-coloring plugin I created (for PhotoShop)  to show light intensity variation.  In this image the phantom leaf vein structure appears as a pattern of darker pixels.

PhotoShop can't process my 16 bit per channel TIF images and I feel this is probably necessary to improve the final image quality to make the nonphysical leaf structure more discernible.  This is an Open Source project and I am still struggling to learn enough Java to program ImageJ plugins. I am looking for an experienced ImageJ plugin programmer, or group of programmers, interested in the project enough to provide some plugin programming support.

Any questions or interest?

Thanks,

Daddymoen .



Imagination is more important than knowledge.  Albert Einstein
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Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography

nicola giacobbe
I am not interested in bashing your project or otherwise but a bit of  
warning is needed here. If you want to act in a 'scientific' way you  
cannot judge by the unaided eye as the brain is a great pattern finder.  
For example: the main leaf vein going from top to bottom of the image at  
http://afterlife-knowledge.com/leafvein1.jpg has a different slope from  
the phantom one rebuild from the brain.

There must be some objective metrics on the acquised image and the  
conditions must be under strict control. A sunless day does not provide  
the constancy of illumination for objective testing and comparison. Some  
other people, better with different tools or in a different way, must  
obtain the same result and finally there should be some theory (better a  
quantitative one) that frames the result.
That said, good luck with your quest.



On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 17:27:37 +0200, Daddymoen <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I've posted more information on the project describing: operating  
> theory; how
> the images are created; along with two example Digital Phantom Leaf  
> images.
> This can be seen on my website at:
> http://afterlife-knowledge.com/phanpics.html.
>
> The best of the example images is the pair near the bottom of the page.
> The image on the left shows the physical leaf vein structure in the area
> where the physical leaf will later be removed.  The image on the right  
> shows
> the leaf after that portion has been cut away and removed.  This image  
> was
> processed using a rather crude Filtermeister pseudo-coloring plugin I
> created (for PhotoShop)  to show light intensity variation.  In this  
> image
> the phantom leaf vein structure appears as a pattern of darker pixels.
>
> PhotoShop can't process my 16 bit per channel TIF images and I feel this  
> is
> probably necessary to improve the final image quality to make the
> nonphysical leaf structure more discernible.  This is an Open Source  
> project
> and I am still struggling to learn enough Java to program ImageJ  
> plugins. I
> am looking for an experienced ImageJ plugin programmer, or group of
> programmers, interested in the project enough to provide some plugin
> programming support.
>
> Any questions or interest?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Daddymoen .
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> View this message in context:  
> http://imagej.1557.n6.nabble.com/Digital-Phantom-Leaf-Photography-tp4633718p4674386.html
> Sent from the ImageJ mailing list archive at Nabble.com.


--
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Re: Digital Phantom Leaf Photography

Daddymoen
Nicola,

Thank you for you reply, I completely agree with your comments, that's why I am here in this ImageJ community.  

For this effort to be anything that could be labeled scientific, and be replicated by others, it needs at the very least to have consistent, high quality images of the supposed phantom leaf effect.   ImageJ software has the capability I need to handle 16 bit per channel image files. And its standard features and available plugins have demonstrated it may be possible to use it to tease phantom leaf vein structures from TIF image files.   But, until  there more consistently attainable, good quality images not much progress from these, first, crude efforts is going possible.  That's why I am asking for assistance from the ImageJ community with plugin writing, to work on finding a more reliable way of analyzing, obtaining and displaying the images.  

The images on my website were some of my very first, crude, attempts to experiment with the possibility that these supposed "phantom leaves" existed at all.  They were never intended to prove their existence to a scientific method level, just basic exploratory research.  Kind of like boarding a tiny little ship pre-1492 and sailing west into the open ocean looking for a new world.  They were just a mechanical engineer's way of exploring beyond the horizon, so to speak.  The method I used was a stumbling series of old engineer's practical approaches to short cuts (like cloudless day sunlight to obtain uniform background illumination) in attempt to get any useful result.  

The technique describe on my website was just a trial and error developmental approach that yielded ANY results that could at least trick my  pattern matching brain into believing there might be something there, maybe.  Personally, I've seen enough photographic evidence in using my crude methods to convinced myself that further developmental effort is warranted.  

My assumption is that once a method is developed that can consistently yield high quality images, that method will be reducible to a set of specific test conditions and protocols science can use to attempt to replicate the experiments.

 I feel like I may have found a tiny island, but I need a better telescope to see more.

Thanks  again for your reply, Nicola

Daddymoen
Imagination is more important than knowledge.  Albert Einstein
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